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George Washington

George Washington played by Ian Kahn 6

George Washington played by Ian Kahn 5

George Washington played by Ian Kahn 4

George Washington in-universe 4 – Turn - Washington's Spies

George Washington in-universe 5 – Turn - Washington's Spies

Name: George Washington
Status: Alive
Age: 46
Date of birth: February 22, 1732
Birthplace: Westmoreland,
Virginia Colony,
British America
Nationality: Flag of the United States American
Residence(s): Mount Vernon, Virginia,
United States of America
Alias(es): Nickname:
Hero of Monongahela
Culper code number:
711
Affiliation: Virginia provincial militia
Continental Army
Culper Ring
Profession: Continental Army:
Commander-in-Chief
Rank: Continental Army:
General
Father: Augustine Washington (d. 1743)
Mother: Mary Ball Washington
Sibling(s): Brothers:
Samuel Washington
John Augustine Washington
Charles Washington
Sisters:
Betty Washington Lewis
Mildred Washington (d. 1740)
Half-brother:
Lawrence Washington
Marital status: Married
Spouse(s): Martha Dandridge Custis
Other family: Nephews:
Bushrod Washington
Played by: Ian Kahn
Bryan Adrian (young)
Seasons: 1, 2, 3
First episode: "Epiphany"
First mentioned: Turn: Origins
Appears in: 1 series, 3 seasons, 17 episodes, 1 comic
"Excellent question."
George Washington's recurring response to Benjamin Tallmadge's questions.[src]

George Washington (born February 22, 1732 [O.S. February 11, 1731]) is the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army. In 1776, with the assistance of the early beginnings of the Culper Ring, General Washington received intelligence regarding a Hessian encampment at Trenton, New Jersey. He led the Continental Army across the Delaware River into a surprise attack against them.

After the victory, General Washington met with Captain Benjamin Tallmadge, a member of the Culper Ring and began to question him about Abraham Woodhull, becoming interested in their war efforts.

Along with Captain Tallmadge, Nathaniel Sackett and General Charles Scott, the topic of making the spy ring official was discussed. After much conversing, General Washington promoted Tallmadge to Major, gave him command of the spy ring and with Tallmadge choosing the given name of Samuel, after his own brother, Washington chose the name Mr. Culpeper for Abraham's alias.

General Washington later worked with Major Tallmadge and Sackett to counter a British strategy to take Philadelphia, but the British managed to capture the city. Washington later told Tallmadge to engage Abe or to recommend a new head of intelligence. Soon, Washington received intelligence gathered by Abe in New York on British forces.

General Washington later received intelligence from Patience Wright and made plans for it to reach the French. Soon after, Sackett was killed and the intelligence was retrieved by Robert Rogers after killing its carrier. Washington soon became conflicted after Abe was captured in New York, with Major Edmund Hewlett being held, as well, for murder and being a way for Abe to be released.

General Washington decided to pardon Hewlett to free Abe, but Hewlett's captors were attacked by Captain John Graves Simcoe and the Queen's Rangers, with Hewlett fleeing. Washington later met with his major generals and informed them of a plan to retake New York. After leaving the meeting, Washington was greeted by Lafayette, a French officer who informed him that King Louis was impressed by his victory at Saratoga and would like to form an alliance.

General Washington later led the Continental Army to victory during the Battle of Monmouth, exposing General Charles Lee for his attempt to set a trap to cause them to lose the battle. With the help of the Culper Ring and new members, Robert Townsend, a plot against Washington was soon foiled, with Ben and Lieutenant Caleb Brewster securing Major William Bradford and Thomas Hickey, one of his accomplices. Washington soon viewed the hanging of Bradford and Hickey, along with Ben and Caleb. Another spy, Reverend Worthington was discovered due to intelligence from Townsend. After receiving permission from General Washington, Ben executed Worthington a short time later.

General Washington later received a message from Townsend regarding a British plot to print counterfeit money and devalue the Continental dollar. General Washington soon met with Ben and Caleb to discuss Townsend's report. Washington lamented that they received the message too late. Ben, Caleb and Anna discussed where to find the shovers and how to stop them. After the three realized the British plan, Ben, Caleb and others went to stop them, resulting in the death of Lieutenant Gamble, the man who killed Sackett.

When Ben and Caleb returned to camp, General Washington and Ben examined the counterfeit bills that they recovered in the Moodna Creek raid. Unable to discern any difference from legitimate bills, Washington decided to visit Philadelphia to convince Congress to recall all bills. He also decided to reduce the delivery time of Townsend's reports by eliminating the Setauket run and cutting Abe out of the Ring.

General Washington, Ben and William Lee later attended a ball thrown by Benedict Arnold. Washington was reunited with his wife Martha during the ball. When Arnold later met with General Washington in private, Arnold begged Washington to move up the date of his court martial so that he could quickly settle the accusations against him. Joseph Reed shortly after threatened to deny Washington's recall request if Washington helped Arnold. As Washington mulled over his dilemma, Martha playfully accused him of not wanting to be disliked by anyone.

After making a decision, General Washington informed Arnold that he would ask Congress to speed up the court martial process. Arnold thanked him profusely. Not long after, Washington danced with Peggy while Martha danced with Arnold. A flicker of unease crossed Ben's face as he watched everyone, not knowing that Arnold had written to John André.

BiographyEdit

Early life (1732–1753)Edit

The first child of Augustine Washington (1694–1743) and his second wife, Mary Ball Washington (1708–), George Washington was born on their Pope's Creek Estate near present-day Colonial Beach in Westmoreland County, Virginia. According to the Julian calendar and Annunciation Style of enumerating years, then in use in the British Empire, Washington was born on February 11, 1731; when the Gregorian calendar was implemented in the British Empire in 1752, in accordance with the provisions of the Calendar (New Style) Act 1750, his birth date became February 22, 1732.

He received the equivalent of an elementary school education. Thanks to his brother Lawrence, Washington was appointed official surveyor for Culpeper County.

George Washington with Lawrence Washington in Barbados – Turn - Washington's Spies

George Washington with his brother Lawrence in Barbados.

Washington later traveled to Barbados with Lawrence, who was suffering from tuberculosis, with the hope that the climate would be beneficial to Lawrence's health. Washington contracted smallpox during the trip, which left his face slightly scarred, but immunized him against future exposures to the dreaded disease. Lawrence's health did not improve; he returned to Mount Vernon, where he died in 1752.

French and Indian War (or 'Seven Years War', 1754–1758)Edit

The French attacked and captured Washington at Fort Necessity in July 1754. However, he was allowed to return with his troops to Virginia. Both France and Great Britain were ready to fight for control of the region and both sent troops to North America in 1755; war was formally declared in 1756.

During the French and Indian War, George Washington served on the same side as Robert Rogers.

Braddock disaster 1755Edit

"Stand with me, men! Fight!"
George Washington to British Army forces during the Battle of the Monongahela.[src]
George Washington during the Battle of the Monongahela – Turn - Washington's Spies

Colonel Washington leads British forces during the Battle of the Monongahela.

In 1755, Washington was the senior American aide to British General Edward Braddock on the ill-fated Braddock expedition. This was the largest British expedition to the colonies, and was intended to expel the French from the Ohio Country. The French and their Indian allies ambushed Braddock, who was mortally wounded in the Battle of the Monongahela. After suffering devastating casualties, the British retreated in disarray; however, Washington rode back and forth across the battlefield, rallying the remnants of the British and Virginian forces to an organized retreat.

George Washington's speaks about Edward Braddock – Turn - Washington's Spies

Colonel Washington speaking about General Braddock.

Later on, Colonel Washington and his men buried General Braddock and held a memorial service for him. After the service, Colonel Washington rode to Fort Cumberland, Maryland and was complimented by his superior officer on his service during the battle, having had two horses shot out from under him and surviving without a scratch on him.

Colonel Washington was then informed that many now call him the Hero of Monongahela. However, his superior officer informed him that his surrender at Fort Necessity one year prior and the loss of General Braddock had caused the upper ranks to re-evaluate the promotion that he had been seeking. He was informed that he will remain in the Provincial Militia, giving support to the Royal Army officers.

Colonel Washington was then ordered to ship all of General Braddock's belongings to General Johnson, including a blade that General Braddock had given him during the battle. He agreed to the order as he left his superior officer's tent. Later, the same superior officer had a meeting with Robert Rogers, ordering Rogers to continue northern attacks. After giving Rogers his orders, the officer left the tent, with Braddock's blade remaining on his desk, which Rogers soon took.

American Revolution (1775–present)Edit

After the Battles of Lexington and Concord near Boston in April 1775, the colonies went to war. Congress created the Continental Army on June 14, 1775. Washington was then appointed General and Commander-in-Chief.

Robert Rogers later arrived in York City, America from London. He soon managed to have a meeting with General Henry Clinton and Captain John André and offered his services to them. After General Clinton offered to consider the proposal, Rogers left, telling them not to wait too long to make a decision.

George Washington has Robert Rogers arrested in 1775 – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington has Major Rogers arrested.

Rogers then went to General Washington, returning to him the blade that General Braddock had given to him years earlier and to offer him his services. However, Washington had been informed of Rogers' offer to the British, as Rogers had been followed under Washington's orders. Rogers attempted to grab the blade and attack Washington, but he was stopped by William Lee and soon seized by Continental guards. Washington placed him under arrest and ordered the guards to have him taken to New Hampshire to be tried for treason.

Rogers later escaped on the way to New Hampshire after killing one of the Continental soldiers transporting him and knocking out the other, soon returning to Clinton and André and warning them that Washington was wily, dangerous and that even if he is outnumbered, he can still achieve victory. Clinton and André accepted his offer.

"Do not yield an inch!"
George Washington to Continental Army forces during the Battle of Harlem Heights.[src]
George Washington during the Battle of Harlem Heights – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington leads Continental forces during the Battle of Harlem Heights.

In the autumn of 1776, General Washington led his soldiers on the battlefield against the British during the Battle of Harlem Heights, fighting alongside them and obtaining a victory after the British retreated. He later observed their encampment for movement and noticed a stalemate, hoping that his troops in New Jersey had obtained similar favor.

However, Washington was later informed by the advance New Jersey unit that Captain Benjamin Tallmadge's entire regiment was lost, drawn into a tactical ambush by Rogers and the Queen's Rangers. Washington, angered, swiped the papers on his desk into the air. He soon sent for a messenger, to get a message to Westchester County, to be delivered to Nathaniel Sackett, a civilian, in the hopes of recruiting others like him, having need of their services.

Later, General Washington was evading the British Army. After the capture of Fort Lee, it was rumored that Washington had been taken captive by the British. This information struck fear into various Continental Army forces, including Quill, Eben and Newt Bascombe.

The three brothers then committed a mutiny against General Charles Scott, attempting to retrieve the prisoner, Captain John Graves Simcoe and return him to the British Army for a fee. However, with some trickery, Captain Benjamin Tallmadge managed to kill Quill and take the remaining two brothers captive.

Captain Simcoe was taken back into Continental Army custody and Eben and Newt were shortly after executed by General Scott, who wanted them to serve as an example to those that would try to do the same.

During these events, Abraham Woodhull was in New York and encountered two Hessians gathered around a campfire, with their fellow soldiers marching in the distance. Abe questioned them as to their purpose and was soon informed of their intentions to march upon Trenton, New Jersey.

Abe brought this information to Lieutenant Caleb Brewster, who in turn brought it to the attention of Captain Tallmadge via a letter. Tallmadge and Brewster informed General Scott of the information, but the General refused to believe it without knowing the name of its source and burned the letter.

George Washington report table – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington's table of reports.

Caleb and Tallmadge then worked together to craft a new letter and smuggle it into a report that would be read by General Washington. They went to a fellow Continental Army soldier to write the new letter and through some trickery and false information, General Scott approved their fictional report, with Abe's information attached to it.

The report was delivered to General Washington's headquarters, but it was placed among a table of a great many other reports for the General to read.

"Now... just who is Abraham Woodhull?"
George Washington to Benjamin Tallmadge.[src]
George Washington speaks to Benjamin Tallmadge – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington questions Captain Tallmadge about Abraham Woodhull.

However, General Washington managed to receive the letter and on December 25th, he marched his troops to Trenton and defeated the Hessians. General Washington and his troops then marched to Princeton, with Tallmadge and Brewster aiding the remaining few troops in tricking the British Army into believing that the Continental Army remained encamped across from them.

After the Continental victories at Trenton and Princeton, General Washington arrived at Continental headquarters in Morristown, New Jersey to grand praise from his men and met with Captain Tallmadge, asking who Abraham Woodhull was.

George Washington asks if more intelligence can be gathered – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington asks if more intelligence can be gathered.

General Washington introduced Captain Tallmadge and General Scott to Nathaniel Sackett and a discussion between the four occurred regarding bringing the spy ring to an official status. Washington let it be known that he was weary of contradictory accounts of enemy intentions and informed the men that he asked them there to determine if the success of Abe's Trenton intelligence was a fluke and perhaps, more importantly, that the fluke can be repeated.

General Scott opposed Sackett's being there, as he was a civilian, but Washington informed Scott that Sackett came to his attention by way of William Duer. General Washington asked the room to explore the chain of spies notion to be explored and a unified recommendation to be ready upon his return.

General Washington asked if anyone had any questions, to which Tallmadge asked how he came upon the name Woodhull. Replying only that it was an "Excellent question", Washington then asked if Sackett had any questions of his own, to which he replied that he had plenty, but none for Washington. Washington then left the room, leaving the other three men to discuss a potential spy ring.

George Washington gives trust to Benjamin Tallmadge – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington discloses his source to Captain Tallmadge.

After General Washington returned, he learned that there was much debate and mistrust regarding Tallmadge's questioning of General Washington's source for Abraham Woodhull's name. Washington then brought Tallmadge outside and explained to him that he gathered the knowledge through a Continental spy and friend of Tallmadge, the late Nathan Hale.

After an earlier suggestion by Sackett, General Washington then concocted an alias for Abraham, Mr. Culpeper. After promoting him to Major and giving him command of the spy ring, General Washington left the given name for Tallmadge to decide, to which Samuel was chosen, in honor of his brother.

The Culper Ring was officially formed, with General Washington in command and with members including Sackett, Ben, Abe, Caleb, Anna Strong and Abigail, a former slave and housemaid of Anna's now spying for the Culper Ring as John André's housemaid in New York.

When Caleb gave Abe a dictionary with numbers referring to names and words to use in the correspondence to agents of the ring, General Washington was referred to as 711. Soon after learning his alias from the dictionary, Abe revealed his distaste for the Culpeper name.

George Washington meets with Benjamin Tallmadge and Nathaniel Sackett – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington, Major Tallmadge and Sackett plan a counter to the British attack strategy.

General Washington would later meet with Major Tallmadge and Sackett in Morristown, regarding a possible Philadelphia attack. Having decoded enemy dispatches using a cipher key that Abe obtained from John André, they learned that the attack would come from the south and not the north as reports had led them to believe.

General Washington ordered Major Tallmadge to ready a detachment of dragoon and militia troops to head north and rendezvous with General Arnold in Connecticut to play into Britain's plan, while the Continental forces shored up their southerly defenses on the Delaware in preparations for the attack and gave him discretion to act as he saw fit to fulfill his mission.

Major Tallmadge later led Continental forces into Setauket to rescue his father and Lieutenant Brewster's uncle. Partly a success with the rescue of the elder Tallmadge, Lieutenant Brewster's uncle was killed by Captain Simcoe, who was soon after arrested.

The Continental forces withdrew after Major Edmund Hewlett released the prisoners into Continental Army custody. A part of the brief battle, Abe Woodhull agreed to continue working for General Washington, so long as he could use the name "Culper" instead of his given alias.

Two months after the Battle of Setauket, Major Tallmadge brought a written attack against General Washington's leadership to his attention. Entitled "The Thoughts of a Free Man", it was an anonymously written attack that blamed General Washington for the loss of Philadelphia, calling for his exile and even compared him to the demon Baʿal. Major Tallmadge then informed him that there were rumors that Generals Gates and Lee had written to congress, calling for his removal as Commander-in-Chief.

General Washington paid little mind to Major Tallmadge's report of the written attack and reminded him that he asked for an intelligence report on the movements of the enemy forces and not rumor. Major Tallmadge then informed him that he saw himself as the eyes and ears against all threats to his leadership. In reply, General Washington asked Major Tallmadge what he saw and heard from Philadelphia -- nothing. He then asked about New York -- nothing as well.

"I require a full report on New York Harbor before we move camp. You shall engage Culper or recommend to me a new head of intelligence."
George Washington to Benjamin Tallmadge.[src]
George Washington asks for a full report on New York Harbor – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington asks Major Tallmadge for a full report on New York Harbor from Abe or to recommend a new head of intelligence.

With no new information from Philadelphia or New York, General Washington asked Major Tallmadge about any word from Abe, to which Major Tallmadge informed him that it was still too dangerous to make contact. General Washington then asked for a full report on New York Harbor before they move camp from from Morristown, New Jersey and to engage Abe or to recommend to him a new head of intelligence.

Major Tallmadge later became involved in an argument with Major William Bradford over the written attack. The argument led to a physical brawl between Major Tallmadge, Major Bradford and various Continental troops against Tallmadge. As he was held down by the men, Lieutenant Brewster arrived and struck Major Bradford. Tallmadge and Brewster then fought and quickly beat Bradford and the men, ending the brawl.

Later, at a dinner amongst General Washington, Major Tallmadge and other Continental officers, as well as Théveneau de Francy, General Lee began to read "The Thoughts of a Free Man" aloud. Lee stopped reading and informed General Washington that he wouldn't want to read it, so General Washington insisted that it be read by Lee instead. During the reading, General Arnold arrived and took the writing from Lee. He then read it and mocked it aloud, insulting Lee and defending General Washington, to Major Tallmadge's agreement.

George Washington introduces Benedict Arnold to Lazare-Jean Théveneau de Francy – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington introduces General Arnold to Théveneau de Francy.

General Washington then introduced Théveneau de Francy to General Arnold, who asked Arnold to join them. Arnold looked and was unable to find an empty seat, but Major Tallmadge volunteered his seat at the table. General Washington then asked Arnold if he still had an appetite, to which Arnold replied, "Always". General Washington then nodded at Lee, who had a look of annoyance on his face.

Arnold later disobeyed retreat orders given by General Gates during the Battles of Saratoga and managed to secure a victory, but was wounded in the left leg, where he had been wounded twice before, in the process.

"Seems our Culper Ring is alive and well."
George Washington to Benjamin Tallmadge.[src]
George Washington reads Abraham Woodhull's report aloud to Benjamin Tallmadge – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington reads Abe's report aloud to Major Tallmadge.

Through Abe's travels to York City to gather intelligence, General Washington later received and excitedly read Abe's report on British forces, as well as intelligence from Abigail in Philadelphia. However, having not heard of Abigail earlier and with the note, reading: “General Lee a traitor,” lacking context, General Washington dismissed it, to Ben's dismay.

Ben later took it upon himself to find proof to back up the letter and enlisted the assistance of Sackett to do so by forging a letter from General Gates to General Lee, to provoke and intercept a response from Lee as proof.

George Washington greets Benedict Arnold – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington greets a wounded General Arnold.

General Washington later visited General Arnold, still recovering from his recent wounds received during the Battles of Saratoga, in a medical tent and informed him that he’s been promoted to Major General, but will still be subordinate to the same people. This angered Arnold, who pointed out that he’d won more battles than his superiors. “We must all continue to make sacrifices,” Washington told him. “What do you know of sacrifice?” Arnold asked back, noting his wife did not come from means like Washington's did. Arnold then asked for Washington's support, who informed Arnold that it has been there and will always be.

Ben later went to Arnold in the medical tent and engaged in a conversation with him while secretly dropping his forged letter with Arnold's others for a courier to retrieve.

"It is better to offer no excuse than a bad one."
George Washington to Benjamin Tallmadge.[src]
George Washington explains the important of France's assistance to Benjamin Tallmadge – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington explains the importance of France's assistance to Major Tallmadge.

Later, in General Washington’s office, Ben read aloud a letter of General Lee’s, and urged Washington to take action. Washington asked how Ben obtained the letter, with Ben informing him that he forged a letter from General Gates to coerce the response, upsetting Washington. Washington angrily rebuked Ben, telling him they cannot appear divided and weak because it will jeopardize a potential alliance with France. After Ben left, Washington began to burn the letter, putting it on his desk, but soon angrily slammed his hand down on the flame, putting it out.

General Washington and his forces soon moved camp to Valley Forge. There, a British officer who claimed to be named Sutherland surrendered himself. Ben interrogated Sutherland to figure out whether he was a spy or a true defector. To prove his loyalty, Sutherland warned that a civilian named Bill Shanks would soon visit them with a “wild claim,” with the true intention of spying for the king.

George Washington receives the intelligence from the bust – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington receives the intelligence from the bust.

Caleb later returned from a mission to New Jersey with intel from a wax bust of King George. Sackett excitedly read the intel and rushed it over to General Washington. Upon reading it, Washington sent for Théveneau de Francy.

"It is time to unite."
George Washington to Théveneau de Francy.[src]
George Washington after telling Théveneau de Francy that it is time to unite – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington after telling Théveneau de Francy that it is time to unite.

Later, Théveneau de Francy read the intel — a page torn from King George’s financial ledger which showed that England was virtually bankrupt. Washington said that it was time to unite, with the page being proof to France that they could win the war, with de Francy vowing to take the intelligence straight to King Louis.

To throw off Robert Rogers’ scent, Washington sent out decoy detachments so that de Francy could escape in the guise of a fur trader. Shortly after, Bill Shanks arrived — just as Sutherland predicted. Ben interrogated Shanks, who warned that someone close to Washington would attempt to assassinate him. Ben and Sackett continued to interrogate Shanks, who said he learned about the assassination plot when he eavesdropped on two Royal officers — one of whom had a blond braid.

Ben relayed this information to Sutherland, who identified the blond officer as John André. To test Sutherland, Ben said Washington might leave camp in response to Shanks’ report of an imminent attack. Sutherland advised them to keep Washington in Valley Forge, leading Ben to presume that Sutherland wanted to keep Washington near so that he can kill him.

George Washington questions Bartholomew Shanks – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington questions Bartholomew Shanks.

Ben then told Washington about Sutherland and Shanks. Washington discovered Shanks’ name on a list of men who were reported missing at a recent massacre and accused Shanks of deserting and defecting to the enemy. Ben maintained his theory that Shanks was telling the truth, but Washington accused him of poor judgment and ordered Sackett, not Ben, to debrief Sutherland.

Later, Sackett interrogated Sutherland in his tent, while Ben continued to interrogate Shanks and learned that one of the Royal officers who Shanks overheard had a scar on his cheek — just like Sutherland. Ben sprinted over to Sackett’s tent but it was too late: Sackett lied dead in a pool of blood, killed by Sutherland, whose name was really Gamble, a Lieutenant in the British Army.

"Certain I was right. I was certain."
George Washington to William Lee.[src]
George Washington says that he was certain he was right – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington saying that he was certain he was right.

Ben informed Washington that Sutherland stole vital documents, some of which contained the name Culper. He angrily stormed off, accusing Washington of being blind, with Washington saying that he was certain he was right. That night, Rogers ambushed de Francy as he secretly escaped through the woods. He slit de Francy’s throat and left with the intelligence in hand.

Anna later wrote an encoded letter to Ben on the title page of a book, alerting him that Abe had been arrested. She also divulged that Abe had been pretending to spy for Hewlett in order to ensure safe passage to York City.

After hearing of the letter, General Washington fired Ben as head of intelligence for allowing Abe to “go rogue.” Ben and Caleb then decided to rescue Hewlett on their own so Hewlett could exonerate Abe.

George Washington after having a hallucination of his teeth falling out – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington after having a hallucination of his teeth falling out.

Later at Valley Forge, Billy Lee informed General Washington that a messenger to Connecticut must depart no later than midnight because of an impending storm. Washington hallucinated that his teeth were falling out of his mouth, and asked Billy to summon the doctor.

The doctor diagnosed Washington with melancholia, brought on by “deep moral conflict within the soul,” and noted that the condition can sometimes lead to madness. Washington attributed the melancholia to his indecision over a written request from Major Hewlett’s captor in Connecticut, Lt. Chaffee, to execute Hewlett. He enlisted Billy to help him decide Hewlett’s fate, noting the execution will go forward if he does not dispatch the messenger to Connecticut in time.

Washington soon informed Billy that Culper (Abe) had been captured and imprisoned in York City on charges of espionage.

George Washington playing Whist with William Lee – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington playing Whist with Billy Lee.

Washington agonized over his decision to execute or pardon Hewlett, who was the only man who could prove Abe’s innocence. He challenged Billy to a game of Whist and reminisced about his deceased half-brother, Lawrence, who he revered. As they played, Billy suggested that Washington might be overthinking the decision, and Washington exploded at Billy. As they resumed the game, Washington surmised that Abe was still alive — which meant he probably had not confessed. Billy pointed out that Hewlett didn’t confess, either.

"I am not afraid."
George Washington as he begins to make his way into the woods.[src]
George Washington making his way into the woods – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington making his way into the woods.

Billy told Washington that Lawrence would never have let Hewlett live — and that Washington does not need to be like Lawrence. Washington shoved Billy onto the table and ordered him never to speak of Lawrence again. Washington then stormed outside for a walk, and hallucinated a trail of bloody footprints leading into the woods. He states that he is not afraid, before making his way into the woods.

George Washington kneeling alone in the woods – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington kneeling alone in the woods after asking Lawrence for advice.

In the woods, Washington saw an apparition of Lawrence and begged for his advice. Lawrence said he would never have lost Long Island or retreated at White Plains — but he also would not have crossed the Delaware to victory or taken on the mightiest empire on earth. “Then again, I am not you,” Lawrence said, then disappeared.

Washington returned to his tent and thanked Billy for his help. He then wrote to Lt. Chaffee, staying Hewlett’s execution so they could trade Hewlett for high-ranking Patriot POWs. Back in his own tent, Billy looked inside his bag and found Washington’s beloved pocket watch, given to Washington by Lawrence. It was now a gift from Washington to Billy.

Later, however, as Lt. Chaffee read Washington’s stay of execution, Simcoe and the Queen’s Rangers ambushed the camp. Simcoe entered the stockade and told Hewlett he had hoped they would execute him sooner. Hewlett stabbed Simcoe in the side with a knife given to him by Lt. Chaffee and escaped. A shocked and bleeding Simcoe vowed to kill Hewlett.

George Washington conveys the plan to retake New York – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington informs his major generals of the plan to retake New York.

At Valley Forge, Washington later informed his major generals of the plan to retake New York. When General Lee reacted skeptically, Washington guaranteed that there were, at most, 3,500 British soldiers stationed in the city — intel he knew thanks to one of Abe’s intelligence reports.

Lafayette, a French officer soon arrived and informed Washington that King Louis was impressed by Washington’s victory at Saratoga and would like to form an alliance. That night, the Continental Army soldiers celebrated the alliance as Washington rode into camp with his men. As they dismounted, Washington watched as Arnold struggled to dismount from his horse with his injured leg.

George Washington looks at Benedict Arnold – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington watches as General Arnold leaves in anger about his new post.

Washington later informed Arnold that he’d being promoted to military commandant of Philadelphia. When Arnold fumed after realizing his new post did not involve going into battle, Washington noted that Arnold was not yet fit to return to the field because he was still recuperating from his leg injury. Washington then watched as Arnold angrily left the tent.

Later, in Washington’s tent, Major Bradford, General Charles Lee’s aide, briefed Washington on a plan to attack the British as they retreated to New York. Washington asked Lee if he endorsed the plan, given that he usually acted with caution. Lee admitted that he had learned from Washington’s bold field tactics, and apologized for ever doubting Washington’s leadership.

George Washington walks past Benjamin Tallmadge – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington walks past Major Tallmadge.

Outside, Ben tried to speak with Washington but was stonewalled. Billy Lee pulled Ben aside and warned him that Washington just gave control of half of the army to General Lee after Lee's apology.

Ben soon met with Bradford and told him that he wanted to offer up his dragoons to General Lee and apologized for their past disagreements. Bradford accepted Ben’s offer, but reminded Ben that he would answer directly to him.

Later, in Setauket, Abe, now recently returned from prison after Hewlett's escape and return to Setauket, which led to him arranging for Abe to be released, went to his spy cave and found Anna there waiting for him. Abe soon applied invisible ink reagent to a note from Robert Townsend, who Abe had been trying to recruit to the Culper Ring without success. Abe learned that Townsend used proceeds from the sale of his boarding house to buy a coffee house that was popular with senior officers in the British army and government. Townsend reported that he has already learned of a plot against Washington.

After a struggle with Captain Simcoe's Queen's Rangers, Abe gave Caleb Townsend’s note and urged him to deliver it to Ben and Washington right away.

Later, during the Battle of Monmouth, in New Jersey, Ben lead his dragoons into battle, only to realize that Lee had led them into a trap. Caleb arrived with Townsend’s letter and warned Ben of the plot to harm Washington. Clinton and André watched from a hilltop as Redcoats fired on Ben’s dragoons. As Simcoe lead his Rangers into the fray, Bradford ordered his men to fall back.

George Washington arrives during the Battle of Monmouth – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington arrives during the Battle of Monmouth.

Ben yelled at Lee for pulling back instead of holding the line as Washington expected. To their surprise, Washington arrived with reinforcements and demanded to know why Lee was retreating. He ordered Lee to the rear, then barked out orders to attack the enemy. Clinton and André watched unhappily as the Patriots gained the upper hand and won the battle.

Back at camp, Ben and Caleb knocked Bradford unconscious. Soon after, in his tent, Washington told Ben that he knew about Lee’s treachery thanks to the intelligence from agent 355 — Abigail. Ben informed Washington that Robert Townsend was their new contact in York City, and that Townsend already uncovered a conspiracy plot against Washington that included Bradford. Ben asked Washington’s guard, Hickey, to bring Bradford to the tent.

George Washington discusses the Culper Ring with Benjamin Tallmadge and Caleb Brewster – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington discusses the Culper Ring with Major Tallmadge and Lieutenant Brewster.

Hickey went to the holding cell and readied his knife to kill Bradford, stating that they’d both be discovered, but Caleb emerged from the shadows and caught Hickey red-handed. Caleb soon arrived in Washington’s tent to report that Hickey and Bradford had both been secured. Washington declared that as long as the Culper Ring remained secret, it was safe.

Back in Setauket, Rogers had captured Abe and held him in the spy cave, revealing that he knew the identity of everyone in the Culper Ring. He vowed to use Abe to get his revenge on André, for attempting to have him killed.

Later, Ben and Caleb are interrogated Bradford and Hickey about receiving money from Mr. Matthews and Governor Tryon. Ben asked who else in the camp was being paid off by the British and said that in exchange for information, the men would hang for counterfeiting instead. Hickey stated that he wished to be hanged for treason.

George Washington views the hanging of William Bradford and Thomas Hickey – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington views the hanging of William Bradford and Thomas Hickey.

Bradford suggested that Ben trade them for Culper instead. General Washington offered to free the first man who disclosed the true name of Culper. When Hickey and Bradford didn't respond, General Washington realized that they didn't know that Culper was an alias. The next day, Bradford and Hickey were hanged, with Caleb acting as their executioner.

Benedict Arnold later rode into camp at Valley Forge, looking for General Washington. Ben directed him to Washington's tent, where Arnold fumed to Washington about the warrant against him and wondered how to shake the rumors of treason that have plagued him. Washington suggested that he apply for a court martial and restore his honor in court.

George Washington discusses Reverend Worthington with Benjamin Tallmadge and Caleb Brewster – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington discusses Reverend Worthington with Major Tallmadge and Lieutenant Brewster.

Townsend later overheard a conversation between Governor William Tryon, Mayor David Matthews, James Rivington and André, revealing that Reverend Worthington was a spy for Tryon and Matthews. Caleb later delivered this intelligence from Townsend to Ben about Reverend Worthington. They glared at Reverend Worthington as he sermonized to soldiers.

Ben soon brought the intelligence to General Washington and guessed that Reverend Worthington had been extracting information from soldiers under the guise of counsel. He offered to kill Reverend Worthington. Washington agreed. Ben later executed Worthington, while wearing civilian clothing. Ben was soon after captured by Lieutenant Gamble, but later managed to escape.

George Washington meets Anna Strong – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington meets Anna Strong.

Later, in General Washington's tent, Washington thanked Anna for all her sacrifices. She had left Setauket after finding no reason for herself to stay any longer. Anna teared up and offered to keep serving the ring. Washington nodded awkwardly.

Later, after Robert Townsend had discovered a British plot to print counterfeit money and devalue the Continental dollar, General Washington met with Ben and Caleb to discuss Townsend's report. Washington lamented that they received the message too late. Ben, Caleb and Anna discussed where to find the shovers and how to stop them. After the three realized the British plan, Ben, Caleb and others went to stop them, resulting in the death of Lieutenant Gamble.

George Washington examines the bills – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington examines the bills.

When Ben and Caleb returned to camp, General Washington and Ben examined the counterfeit bills that they recovered in the Moodna Creek raid. Unable to discern any difference from legitimate bills, Washington decided to visit Philadelphia to convince Congress to recall all bills. He also decided to reduce the delivery time of Townsend's reports by eliminating the Setauket run and cutting Abe out of the Ring.

Later, at Penn Mansion, Arnold threw a lavish ball. Betsy Shippen candidly chatted with Becky Redman and an unidentified older woman. Arnold and Peggy Shippen welcomed Washington, Ben and Billy to the ball. Arnold asked to speak privately with Washington at a later point. Washington soon approached the older woman in Betsy's circle. To Betsy and Becky's surprise, their companion was Martha Washington.

"My beloved."
George Washington to Martha Washington.[src]
George Washington with Martha Washington – Turn - Washington's Spies

General Washington with his wife Martha.

When Arnold later met with General Washington in private, Arnold begged Washington to move up the date of his court martial so that he could quickly settle the accusations against him. Joseph Reed shortly after threatened to deny Washington's recall request if Washington helped Arnold. As Washington mulled over his dilemma, Martha playfully accused him of not wanting to be disliked by anyone.

After making a decision, General Washington informed Arnold that he would ask Congress to speed up the court martial process. Arnold thanked him profusely. Not long after, Washington danced with Peggy while Martha danced with Arnold. A flicker of unease crossed Ben's face as he watched everyone, not knowing that Arnold had written to John André.

Behind the ScenesEdit

"His choices were life and death, not simply easy choices that had very little effect."
George Washington, as described by Ian Kahn.

George Washington was portrayed by Ian Kahn in Seasons 1, 2 and 3 and by Bryan Adrian in a flashback in Season 2 of Turn: Washington's Spies.

AppearancesEdit

DescriptionEdit

Season 2Edit

"This is not the George Washington we are used to seeing on the dollar bill. A 44-year-old general in charge of the Continental Army, he is a detail-oriented perfectionist who is well aware of his shortcomings. Washington is hard on himself as a leader, carefully presenting an image of strength and confidence to a ragtag army lacking those qualities themselves. A man of strong emotions, Washington has learned to restrain himself through sheer strength of will and tries to instill the same discipline in his army and his country. Knowing the fate of the revolution hinges on an alliance with the French, Washington focuses on the bigger picture and keeps his own counsel, which often creates conflict with his spymaster, Ben Tallmadge."
Official description

Season 3Edit

"This is not the George Washington you're used to seeing on the dollar bill. This is Washington in his mid-40's, a detail-oriented perfectionist in charge of the Continental Army. A man of strong emotions, Washington has learned to restrain himself through sheer force of will, and tries to instill the same discipline in his ragtag army and the fledgling country. In season two, we saw a Washington, who was hard on himself as a leader, well aware of his shortcomings as he privately battled them. Washington's insistence on keeping things close to the vest brings him into conflict with Ben Tallmadge, who doesn't understand why Washington won't act against the traitorous General Charles Lee. But Washington is playing the long game, upholding the appearance of unity in the ranks in order to ensure the assistance of the French. It is only at the Battle of Monmouth, when Washington vanquishes Lee and triumphs over the British, that Ben comprehends the extent of Washington's cunning. Washington faces a new series of challenges in the third season, from the infighting of Congress to the collapse of the currency he uses to pay his soldiers. But the greatest threat to Washington is the one closest to him -- the betrayal by his close friend Benedict Arnold."
Official description
Military offices
New creation Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army
1775–
Succeeded by

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